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KU Announces 10 Graduate Research Consultants for Spring Classes

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

LAWRENCE — This spring, 10 graduate research consultants will pair with instructors in a wide variety of fields to challenge undergraduate students to further develop their research skills through classroom-based projects.

The Graduate Research Consultant (GRC) program, administered by KU’s Center for Undergraduate Research, is one of many initiatives at KU to expand experiential learning opportunities to a larger number of students. The GRC program provides financial support ($500) to a graduate student who works with a particular course to help design a research or creative project, mentor students and evaluate student learning. GRCs are expected to work 30 hours over the course of the semester to facilitate the students’ projects. The goal of the program is to enable the instructor to require more demanding research projects while providing more support for the students.

“The GRC program is a part of the overall KU effort to enhance undergraduate instruction at KU,” said John Augusto, assistant vice provost. “The instructors and GRCs have proposed exciting projects for their classes that aim to challenge their students and involve them in the type of intellectual inquiry that is at the core of a research university.”

Instructors and GRCs jointly applied for the awards last fall, detailing the types of research activities they wanted to pursue in their classes and the learning outcomes they hope to achieve through these projects. Instructors, GRCs, and staff with the Center for Undergraduate Research will work together to develop these projects and document student learning to provide models for incorporating research into the classroom for the campus community.

Applications for Fall 2015 GRCs will be accepted later this year. To learn more about the Center for Undergraduate Research or the Graduate Research Consultant Program, visit http://ugresearch.ku.edu/instructors/graduate-research-consultants.

GRC/instructor groups are listed below, along with course information:

Nichol Castro (GRC), doctoral student in psychology, and Jonathan Brumberg, assistant professor in speech-language-hearing; a project with SPLH 320: The Communicating Brain: The Ultimate Personal Computer.

Mackenzie Cremeans (GRC), doctoral student in geology; Leigh Stearns, assistant professor in geology; and Chi Zhang, assistant professor in geology; a project with GEOL 351: Environmental Geology.

Sekyung Jang (GRC), doctoral student in music education and music therapy, and Abbey Dvorak, assistant professor in music education and music therapy; a project with MEMT 296: Clinical Techniques for Adults.

Nathan Jones (GRC), doctoral student in music theory, and Miriam Brack Webber, graduate teaching assistant in music theory; a project with MTHC 315: Theory IV.

Maria Teresa Martinez-Garcia (GRC), doctoral student in linguistics, and Joan Sereno, professor in linguistics; a project with LING 435: Psycholinguistics.

Christina Nelson (GRC), doctoral student in French & Italian, and Paul Scott, associate professor in French & Italian; a project with FREN 480: Studies in French Literature: French Science Fiction & Fantasy.

Natalie Pennington (GRC), doctoral student in communication studies; Marsha McCartney, visiting assistant professor in psychology; and Susan Marshall, lecturer in psychology; a project with PSYC 210: Statistics in Psychological Research.

Vanessa Schott (GRC), doctoral student in educational leadership and policy studies, and Victor Gonzalez, lecturer in undergraduate biology; a project with BIOL 241: Human Anatomy Observation Laboratory.

Meghan Webb (GRC), doctoral student in anthropology, and Kathryn Rhine, assistant professor in anthropology; a project with ANTH 501: Global Health.

Stephanie Willis (GRC), doctoral student in geography, and So-Min Cheong, associate professor in geography; a project with GEOG 379: Adaptation Workshop.

 


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Research teaches critical thinking and problem solving — top skills sought by employers
The Research Experience Program has certified more than 2,000 students since 2005
KU is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research
More than 1,200 students have received Undergraduate Research Awards since 1986
More than 150 mentors sponsored undergraduate projects through the Center for Undergraduate Research each year
KU's first valedictorian, Flora Richardson, conducted research as an undergraduate before graduating in 1873
Highlight your research on your transcript: Get certified through the Research Experience Program
Use research to apply what you learned in the classroom to a real problem
Students who perform research develop strong relationships with KU faculty
Research is a hands-on way to explore career options
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report