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Gabriella Bernard

Student Spotlight | March 2020

Major: Music Therapy

Describe your research/creative work in just a few sentences that we can all understand: As of now, the majority of my research has been identifying, analyzing, and synthesizing existing literature to answer a primary research question (i.e systematic review).  My individual project is a systematic review of trauma-informed care practices with music for refugees and implications for music therapy practice. I am currently accumulating as much research to date that studies how music is used in trauma-informed care practices to support and enhance the lives of refugees. The purpose of this study is to (a) identify trauma-informed care practices using music for people who are refugees, (b) summarize and describe reported outcomes, and (c) discuss possible implications for music therapy clinical work with this population. 

 


Q: Who mentors your project?

A: Dr. Abbey Dvorak

 

Q: What surprised you about doing a larger research project?

A: Easier said than done, but when you finally understand your problem and research question, then the rest starts to fall in line. Starting a larger research project as a group member and individual is daunting at first. The amount of support and guidance from Dr. Dvorak and my teammates has made for experiences that have contributed to my overall growth as a person and researcher. 

 

Q: What did you find most challenging about getting involved in or doing your project? What advice would you offer to students facing similar challenges?

A: Just starting! Half the battle with research is just beginning the initial search and figuring out your research question. For students facing a similar challenge, do not be afraid of drafts and endless brainstorming! The greatest gift that researchers can give themselves is time. If you do not have a mentor, find one! If you have not found one, find a group of peers that you can discuss your ideas with.

 

Q: What do you like most about your project?

A: Working together alongside my mentor, team members, and individuals who are specialists in their field. I get the most excited about learning from others and the collaboration towards a common goal!

 

Q: What advice would you give to a friend wanting to get involved in research?

A: Talk to your professors! Most likely, they are working on something or they know someone who is. Getting involved looks different for everyone. No amount of time on research is too little! In addition, research is not just numbers and graphs, it's about the people you meet and the conversations that can inspire you!

 

Q: How do you spend your time when you're not working on your research?

A: I can be found cooking up a storm, finding the Lawrence hotspots, and going on adventures with my friends!


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