Supporting students, mentors, and instructors engaged in research.

Matthew Canedy

Student Spotlight | October 2018

Major:  Journalism major with a minor in Political Science

Describe your work in a few sentences that we can all understand: I've been working in compiling research and news articles surrounding the AIDS crisis and its effect in the Midwest Region.

 


Q: Who mentors your project?

A: Katie Batza, from the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies Department.

 

Q: What surprised you about doing research?

A: I was surprised more by the sheer amount of information we've found, but I've also been surprised by how difficult it can be to find some of that information.  

 

Q: What did you find most challenging about getting involved in or doing your project? What advice would you offer to students facing similar challenges?

A: I found most challenging just getting to know the baseline knowledge needed to do my research. I would offer the advice that if you're struggling in figuring something out, do not be afraid to ask your mentor because they are there to help you.

 

Q: What do you like most about your project?

A: The thing I like most about my project is the subject of it and just overall working with my mentor. Katie is an amazing mentor and the research is so enthralling and engaging.

 

Q: What advice would you give to a friend wanting to get involved in research?

A: Find something that you could have a passion about, and just start. It doesn't take much, and if it's something you're passionate about, you'll become even more interested.

 

Q: How do you spend your time when you're not working on your research?

A: I usually spend my time when not working by just making sure I'm caught up in my classes, because my classes take more precedence than my research so that I'm able to continue researching.


Spotlight Search



 

 

Connect With Us
Research teaches critical thinking and problem solving — top skills sought by employers
The Research Experience Program has certified more than 2,000 students since 2005
KU is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research
More than 1,200 students have received Undergraduate Research Awards since 1986
More than 150 mentors sponsored undergraduate projects through the Center for Undergraduate Research each year
KU's first valedictorian, Flora Richardson, conducted research as an undergraduate before graduating in 1873
Highlight your research on your transcript: Get certified through the Research Experience Program
Use research to apply what you learned in the classroom to a real problem
Students who perform research develop strong relationships with KU faculty
Research is a hands-on way to explore career options
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report