Supporting students, mentors, and instructors engaged in research.

Mylan Jones

Student Spotlight | March 2017

Major: Strategic Communications

Describe your work in a few sentences that we can all understand: I analyze music videos that MTV showcased as "Buzz Clips" during the '90s. We look for particular trends that MTV might have found interesting or that would easily appeal to their audience. 

 

 

 



Q: Who mentors your project?

A:  Dr. Brad Osborn

 

Q: What surprised you about doing research?

A: The amount of music that I was not aware of. There were a couple of artists that I had heard about here and there but I never took the time to actually listen to them. It is also very interesting to see how music videos have changed since the '90s.

 

Q: What did you find most challenging about getting involved in or doing your project? What advice would you offer to students facing similar challenges?

A: Though I could schedule when I would do my research, it was sometimes difficult to spread out my work. I sometimes would find myself doing things all in one day. Since I already had another job on campus and I write for the UDK, it was sometimes hard to make sure that I find time to work on my research. I would encourage other students to try and develop a schedule when you are able to; this will alleviate some of the stress and difficulty when trying to continue your research.

 

Q: What do you like most about your project?

A: I enjoyed the fact that I was able to research something that I am very passionate about. I love music, it has helped me become the person that I am today. I always enjoy discovering new artists and adding things to my library. I also enjoyed discovering different trends through these music videos. It is appealing to see what kinds of things were extremely popular or what made people individuals during this decade.

 

Q: What advice would you give to a friend wanting to get involved in research?
 
A: Try to find ways to research as soon as you can. The more experience you gather, the better it will help you in the long run. This may seem obvious, but also try to research something that you are really passionate about; you will have more fun that way.
 
 
 
Q: How do you spend your time when you're not working on your research?
 
A: Other than going to class and working on classwork, I hang out with my friends, listen to music, write for the UDK, go to concerts, and a lot more. I try to make sure I have a lot of time to alleviate the stress that comes from being in college.

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